Category Archives: Ethnic Foods

Food Fantasia in San Francisco

Food Fantasia in San Francisco.

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29 Lifechanging Quesadillas You Need to Know About

Source: Emily Fleischaker BuzzFeed Staff 

What have I been doing with my life that I haven’t had a blueberry breakfast quesadilla. What has been the point.

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How to Make Tamales

Source: www.tasteofhome.com

Use these steps to learn how to make tamales, plus find a delicious tamale recipe. 
 
Making tamales is a holiday custom for many families of Mexican heritage. Our test kitchen experts show you how to join in the fun.

Tamales are a celebratory food served during the Christmas season and other special occasions. While they’re a treat to eat, the art of preparing them is just as special. Friends and family come together for tamaladas, a party-like gathering centered around preparing and feasting on these savory stuffed delicacies cooked in corn husks.

Tamale fillings vary—fillings can include roasted peppers, shredded pork, chicken, vegetables, cheese and more. No matter how you fill them, tamales make a festive addition to any celebration.

Step 1

Whip dough (masa) until light and fluffy. It should be very thick and well combined.

Step 2

Properly beaten dough will float when dropped into cold water.

Step 3

Pat dough to within 1-in. of edges of each corn husk. Top with chicken mixture and olives.

Step 4

Roll corn husk around the filling. Fold top and bottom edges under; tie with kitchen string.

Step 5

Arrange tied tamales in an upright position in a steamer basket.

Did You Know?

Masa harina, Spanish for “dough flour,” is the traditional flour used to make tortillas, tamales and other Mexican dishes. Although it is made from ground corn, masa harina is not like cornmeal. You cannot substitute one for the other in recipes.

Note: Look for dried corn husks and masa harina in the ethnic aisle.

Chicken Tamales Recipe

Chicken Tamales RecipeChicken Tamales Recipe photo by Taste of Home

“I love making tamales. They’re a little more time- consuming but worth the effort. I usually make them for Christmas, but my family demands them more often.” —Cindy Pruitt, Grove, Oklahoma

Chicken Tamales Recipe

  • Prep: 2-1/2 hours + soaking
  • Cook: 45 min.
  • Yield: 10 Servings

Ingredients

  • 20 dried corn husks
  • 1 broiler/fryer chicken (3 to 4 pounds), cut up
  • 3 quarts water
  • 1 medium onion, quartered
  • 2 teaspoons salt
  • 1 garlic clove, crushed
  • DOUGH:
  • 1 cup shortening
  • 3 cups masa harina
  • CHICKEN CHILI FILLING:
  • 6 tablespoons canola oil
  • 6 tablespoons all-purpose flour
  • 3/4 cup chili powder
  • 1/2 teaspoon salt
  • 1/4 teaspoon garlic powder
  • 1/4 teaspoon pepper
  • 2 cans (2-1/4 ounces each) sliced ripe olives, drained

Directions

  • Place corn husks in a large bowl; cover with cold water and soak for at least 2 hours.
  • Meanwhile, in a Dutch oven, combine the chicken, water, onion, salt and garlic. Bring to a boil. Reduce heat; cover and simmer for 45-60 minutes or until meat is tender. Remove chicken from broth; set aside until cool enough to handle. Strain broth; skim fat. Finely chop or shred chicken.
  •  For dough, in a large bowl, beat the shortening until light and fluffy, about 1 minute. Add small amounts of masa harina alternately with 2 cups reserved broth, beating until well blended.
  •  Drop a small amount of dough into a cup of cold water; dough should float to the top. If dough does not float, continue beating until dough is light enough to float.
  • In a Dutch oven, heat oil over medium heat; stir in flour until blended. Cook and stir for 7-9 minutes or until lightly browned. Stir in the spices, chicken and 4 cups reserved broth. Bring to a boil. Reduce heat; simmer, uncovered, for 45 minutes or until filling is thickened, stirring occasionally.
  • Drain corn husks and pat dry. Place a corn husk on a work surface with the small end pointing away from you. On large end, spread 3 tablespoons dough to within 1 in. of edges. Top with 2 tablespoons chicken mixture and 2 teaspoons olives. Fold long sides of husk over filling, overlapping slightly. Fold over ends of husk; tie with string to secure. Repeat.
  • In a large steamer basket, position tamales upright. Place basket in a Dutch oven over 1 in. of water. Bring to a boil; cover and steam for 45-50 minutes or until dough peels away from husk, adding additional hot water to pan as needed. Yield: 20 tamales.

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Grilled Roadside Whole Chicken

Source: www.cooking.com – Mexican Everyday by W.W. Norton
 
Click here to find out more!
 
Slow-grilling in Mexico is done directly over a bed of hardwood charcoal that’s quite a distance from the chicken; we can achieve a similar result by heating only part of a gas grill or by banking live coals to the sides. A good number of Mexican chicken grillers are rotisserie jockeys, so if you’re an aficionado of the rotisserie attachment for your grill, you’re in good company.INGREDIENTS

For the Marinade:
1 1/2 tablespoons ground ancho chile powder (available from national companies such as McCormick, Mexican groceries and internet sites)
1 teaspoon dried oregano, preferably Mexican
A big pinch of ground cloves
1/4 teaspoon ground cinnamon, preferably Mexican canela
2 garlic cloves, peeled and finely chopped or crushed through a garlic press
3 tablespoons vinegar (apple cider vinegar gives a Mexican flavor)
1/4 cup orange juice
1 teaspoon salt, plus a little more for the onions
1 large (3-pound) chicken (what some butchers call a large frying chicken, others call a small roasting chicken)
A little vegetable or olive oil for brushing the onions
2 large bunches green onions, preferably the ones with large (1-inch) white bulbs at the end (these “knob” onions are available at Mexican markets and many farmer’s markets), roots and wilted outer leaves removed
About 1 cup Roasted Tomatillo Salsa, for serving
In a small bowl, mix together all the marinade ingredients.
DIRECTIONS

Heat one side of a gas grill to medium. If you have a grill with three burners, heat the outer two to medium, leaving the center one off. Or light a charcoal fire and let it burn until the charcoal is covered with white ash and about medium-hot; bank half the coals to one side of the grill, half to the other.
While the grill is heating, remove the giblets (if there are any) from the cavity of the chicken. Flip the chicken onto its breast. Using poultry shears, cut down both sides of the backbone from tail to neck; discard backbone. Or, if you don’t have shears, lay the bird on its back, insert a long heavy knife into the body cavity and press down hard with a rocking motion to cut down through both sides of the backbone. Open the bird out onto your work surface, breast side up. Make sure that the legs are turned inward. Using your fist or a mallet, wallop the bird on the breast, hard enough to dislodge the center bones and flatten out the breast. Twist the last joint of the wings up over the breast and then down behind the “shoulders,” tucking them in firmly to keep them in place during grilling.
Smear both sides of the chicken with the marinade. Lay in the center of the grill (it will not be over direct heat). Cook, without turning, basting from time to time with any remaining marinade, until the juices run clear when a thigh is pierced deeply with a fork (an instant-read thermometer should register about 160 degrees F when inserted at the thickest part of the thigh), about 45 minutes. If you’re cooking over charcoal, you’ll want to add more charcoal to the fire after half an hour or so—the internal temperature of the grill should stay at about 325 degrees F.
About 10 minutes before the chicken is ready, brush or spray the green onions with oil and sprinkle with salt. Grill directly over the fire, turning frequently, until tender and browned.
Remove the chicken to a cutting board. It will lose less juice if you cover it loosely with foil and let it rest for 5 to 10 minutes.
Cut the chicken into quarters (or smaller pieces). Transfer a portion to each of four dinner plates. Top with the grilled onions, and you’re ready to serve. Pass the salsa separately.
Recipe reprinted by permission of W.W. Norton. All rights reserved.
Nutrition Information
Serves 4 – Facts Per Serving:

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Filed under Cookbook Authors, Ethnic Foods, Mexican, W.W. Norton